Equality Impact Assessment 2012 

1. Approach 

The Equality Impact Assessment consultation on the protected characteristics relating to the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment 2011 took place between 15 May and 22 June.

Evidence underpinning the EIA was taken from:
  • Census information
  • Locally produced research from the last couple of years.
  • Recommendations from the current JSNA.

The recommendations selected for inclusion in the consultation questionnaire was made by the following criteria.

  1. They were public facing
  2. They were not already underway
  3. There was an element of choice or option over implementation

Given the low level of literacy in the borough, selected recommendations were put into plain English.  These ‘plain English’ versions of the recommendations are mentioned throughout this document, where they are prefaced with a number, this relates to the section of the JSNA that contains the original recommendation. 


2. Distribution 

Principally, the following forums in the borough have been engaged with:

  • BAMER forum
  • LGBT forum
  • Silvernet (Older people’s fourm)
  • Disability forum
  • Faith forum

The questionnaire was distributed in hard copy and electronically using the ‘Survey Monkey’ website through a variety of routes including Facebook, Gaydar, Barking and Dagenham Council public communication channels, places of worship, libraries, residents associations.

 

Planning the future of health and wellbeing in Barking and Dagenham event

The Joint event on 6 June with the Local Involvement Network (LINk) was advertised at leisure centres, libraries, the Community and Voluntary sector Ripple Centre and the Local Strategic Partnership meeting in may.  22 questionnaires were completed at this event.


3. Responses 

In total 106 questionnaires were submitted. This can be broken down to:

  • 23 from the joint event with the LINk
  • 5 hardcopies
  • 19 partially completed from the BAD youth forum consultation*
  • 15 partially completed from the Maples consultation*
  • 44 completed electronically via Survey Monkey

*Recommendations for these consultations were chosen on the basis of their relevance to the target audience hence the reason for partial completion


4. Demographics 

Age 

 

 

Answer Options

Response

 Community Mapping 2011

Under 20

27.8%

30.6%

20 - 39

15.3%

30.5%

40 - 60

34.7%

24.6%

Over 60

15.3%

14.4%

Prefer not to say

6.9%

 

 

Compared with figures from community mapping 2011 – respondents are fairly reflective of the wider community.  Over 60 accounts for 14.38% and under 20 accounts for 30.56%.  Differences in the intermediate ages are due to the targeting of older and younger people for this consultation and the demographics of the membership of the LINk.


Disability  

Answer Options

Response

No Disability

63.8%

Visual impairment

5.8%

Speech impairment

0.0%

Wheelchair user

1.4%

Mental health issues

5.8%

Hearing impairment

4.3%

Restricted mobility

14.5%

Learning difficulty

13.0%

 

Community mapping does not break disability into subtypes, but respondents are fairly reflective of the wider community, 76.5% who are not disabled.  The higher number here reflects the targeting of people with disabilities for this consultation and the demographics of the membership of the LINk.


Gender (including trans) 

 

Answer Options

Response

 Community Mapping 2011

Male

33.3%

49.0%

Female

58.3%

51.0%

Transgender

0.0%

 

Prefer not to say

8.3%

 

 

We know from hospital admissions that during the period of 2006- 2011 less than five people registered with a Barking and Dagenham GP were admitted to hospital who had a diagnosis of Gender Identity Disorder – including transsexualism.


Marriage and Civil Partnership 

 

Answer Options

Response

Married

23.9%

Civil Partnered

0.0%

Neither

57.7%

Prefer not to say

18.3%

 

Community mapping 2011 has people aged over 16 who are married as 39.68%.  The difference here reflects the targeting of younger and older people in this consultation.  The local Registrar Service shows 123 Civil Partnerships have been registered since 2005.


Race 

 

Answer Options

Response

 Community Mapping 2011

a) White

56.9%

65.6%

b) Mixed / multiple ethnic groups

1.4%

1.5%

c) Asian / Asian British

12.5%

15.3%

d) Black / African / Caribbean / Black British

23.6%

17.6%

e) Other ethnic group

5.6%

12.3%


Compared with figures from community mapping 2011 – respondents are fairly reflective of the wider community.  White accounts for 65.56%, Asian / Asian British 15.26%.  The difference with Black / African / Caribbean / Black British 17.63% is due to the targeting of young people in this consultation.


Religion and belief 

 

Answer Options

Response

 Community mapping 2011

No religion

15.5%

15.3%

Christian

46.5%

69.0%

Buddhist

1.4%

0.2%

Hindu

0.0%

1.1%

Jewish

2.8%

0.3%

Muslim

12.7%

4.4%

Sikh

5.6%

1.1%

Prefer not to say

15.5%

8.4%


Compared with figures from the community mapping 2011 – respondents show some differences with that of the wider community, Christian 69% and Muslim 4.4%.  No religion is reflective at 15.3%.


Sexual orientation 

 

Answer Options

Response

Heterosexual

66.7%

Gay man

5.6%

Lesbian

0.0%

Bisexual

2.8%

Prefer not to say

25.0%


From community mapping 2011, an estimated 5-7% of the population identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender.


5.  Recommendations  

The following recommendations from the JSNA were used in the public consultation questionnaire.  They are ordered by the priority the public put on each recommendation, based on totaling the number of very important and important responses and comparing these with the number of less important and not at all important responses.

 

Overall, respondents felt that all of the recommendations most closely associated with the nine protected characteristics they were consulted on would have beneficial impacts if implemented.

 

Respondents prioritised only two recommendations with over 40 ‘very important’ preferences, these were 5.8 Improve poor quality homes (43 preferences) and 6.6 Develop services for children and young people who experience domestic sexual violence (40 preferences).  Good quality housing were seen as crucial for an aging population, carers, people with disabilities and the need for independent living.  Considering the growing number of young people in the borough, the changing demographic and the long term implications of domestic sexual violence on their future outcomes goes some way to explaining this prioritisation. The recommendations that received the highest number of beneficial preferences, in order, were:
 

JSNA section

Recommendation in Plain English

7.27

More nurses to support people returning home after a stay in hospital

7.29

More information and support for patients and carers

7.29

Provision of out of hours care to support patients and carers

5.8

Improve poor quality homes

6.6

Develop services for children and young people who experience domestic sexual violence

 

It was felt that more priorisation given to these recommendations had the potential to significantly reduce more costly interventions and detrimental impacts later on.Though beneficial overall, the recommendation that received the highest number of detrimental preferences were:

 

JSNA section

Recommendation in Plain English

7.17

Non-judgemental and ‘young person friendly’ sexual health services should be promoted


Older respondents and those with a religious faith had concerns that promoting such services could lead to higher rates of sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancies.  Younger respondents were concerned that promotion would compromise their ability to access such services without their parents consent.Though beneficial overall, the recommendations that received the highest number of neutral preferences, in order, were:

 

JSNA section

Recommendation in Plain English

3.10

Expansion of the healthy eating reward card scheme for 11-19 year olds

3.5

More investment in tackling childhood obesity

2.11

More emphasis on road safety for children


Older respondents had little knowledge of the reward card scheme and younger respondents were critical of how it was administered.  There was a sense of inevitability about the growing problem of childhood obesity and that while children were taught road safety, rules would be broken when in a rush
.

 


Suggested actions

Three respondents made the following suggestions worthy of note:

  • The taxi card double swipe should be re-instated, this way people will be able to keep active and hopefully healthier.
  • Relationship and Sexual Health Education being delivered to all students consistently and well. min ages 13-18
  • Older people 70+ to live in flats with younger private tenants

Age findings 

Of the 12 age related recommendations that the public were consulted on, they placed them in the following order of importance:

  1. Improve poor quality homes
  2. More nurses to support people returning home after a stay in hospital
  3. More emphasis on independent living
  4. More information and support for patients and carers
  5. Provision of out of hours care to support patients and carers
  6. Develop services for children and young people who experience domestic sexual violence
  7. Free leisure for people aged over 60
  8. More support for young people not in employment education or training
  9. Convert Fews Lodge into extra care housing for people with dementia
  10. More emphasis on road safety for children
  11. More investment in tackling childhood obesity
  12. Expansion of the healthy eating reward card scheme for 11-19 year olds

Respondents felt that more support for volunteering and carers was needed as well as a greater range of activities for older people to do. Alternative formats such as easy read should be provided so as not to have a detrimental impact on age.

Suggested actions
Three respondents made the following suggestions worthy of note:

  • The taxi card double swipe should be re-instated, this way people will be able to keep active and hopefully healthier.
  • Relationship and Sexual Health Education being delivered to all students consistently and well. min ages 13-18
  • Older people 70+ to live in flats with younger private tenants

Disability findings 

Of the nine disability- related recommendations that the public were consulted on, they placed them in the following order of importance:

  1. Specialist services for people with both learning disabilities and mental illness
  2. More psychotherapists and counseling staff to detect and treat mental health issues
  3. Easier way for people with learning disabilities to get into paid and unpaid employment
  4. More inpatient services for severe mental illness
  5. Support for people to move on from supported accommodation on to independent living
  6. Promotion of the ‘Mental Health Direct’ 24 hour support line and the ‘NHS 111’ service
  7. Support for parents with their children’s incontinence
  8. Support for organisations that recruit volunteers with mental health needs
  9. Support for self employment social enterprises and community interest companies

Respondents felt that more support should be given for disabled carers, and consideration is given to providing information in a range of alternative formats to ensure there is not a detrimental impact on disability.  Organisations that help place disabled people into volunteering or work such as Reemploy and Toucan are not necessarily providing value for money and it was felt that general organisations can play a greater role in this field than only relying on specialist disability organisations.


Gender reassignment findings 

Though there were no explicit recommendations in the JSNA relating to this protected characteristic, respondents felt that wider publicity of penalties for trans specific hate crime should be put in place to act as a deterrent.

Suggested actions
Three respondents made the following suggestions worthy of note:

  • A protected pathway involving local groups in the community with an emphasis on ensuring safety of individuals who have had gender re-assignment.
  • Have a dedicated helpline to provide information – maybe put people in touch with people in the same situation, perhaps a social group or forum.
  • There should be more information available and should be a part of the curriculum in schools to provide awareness and support from younger age.

Marriage and civil partnership findings 

Though there were no explicit recommendations in the JSNA relating to this protected characteristic, respondents felt that forced marriages should not be recognised by UK law and that churches should not be asked to perform same sex marriages as that would have a detrimental impact on religion and belief.


Pregnancy and maternity findings 

Of the eight pregnancies and maternity related recommendations that the public were consulted on, they placed them in the following order of importance:

  1. Continue funding of the maternity support service for women experiencing domestic violence
  2. Encouraging women not to smoke during their pregnancy
  3. Develop a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Queens Hospital
  4. ‘NHS Stop Smoking’ should provide services for disadvantaged pregnant women who smoke, their partners and others in the household who smoke
  5. Putting stop smoking services together with ante-natal services in Children’s Centres
  6. Non-judgmental and ‘young person friendly’ sexual health services should be promoted
  7. Education and information for potential parents, expectant mothers, fathers and new parents
  8. Breastfeeding promotion by NHS and schools

Respondents felt that more information on healthy eating and stopping smoking should be provided for pregnant women.

Suggested actions
One respondent made the following suggestion worthy of note:

  • Promote the self-referral route to maternity services if a woman cannot access primary care services

Race findings 

Though there were no explicit recommendations in the JSNA relating to this protected characteristic, respondents felt there should be more emphasis on Sickle Cell Disease and additional resources should be targeted at conditions that are more likely to affect ethnic minorities, although this needs to be done with consideration not to stereotype as this would have a detrimental impact on race. Several respondents pointed out language as having a potentially detrimental impact, reinforcing the need to continue and increase funding of English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL).  Community sensitivities around spitting as a cause for spreading diseases such as TB should be noted.

Suggested actions
Several respondents made the following suggestion worthy of note:

  • Introduce more female GPs in Barking and Dagenham to ensure there are not detrimental impacts on race, religion and belief and pregnancy and maternity.

Gender findings 

Of the three gender-related recommendations that the public were consulted on, they placed them in the following order of importance:

  1. Continue the Women’s Trust specialist domestic violence counselling service
  2. Maintain access to the East London Rape Crisis centre
  3. Continue the community domestic violence perpetrators programme

Sexual orientation findings 

In addition to the JSNA recommendation around adult safeguarding and recording sexual orientation of service users, respondents felt that there were general issues around disclosure for fear of having a detrimental impact on sexual orientation.


Health and Wellbeing Strategy general priority findings 

As part of the consultation questionnaire, the public were consulted on the 17 general priorities contained within the Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy 2012 - 2015. They placed them in the following order of importance:

  1. Reduce hospital acquired infections, such as MSRA
  2. Increase the number of babies born safe and healthy
  3. Improve GPs management of chronic diseases like diabetes and epilepsy
  4. Raise awareness of the early signs of disease
  5. Increase the number of adults over 65 and in vulnerable groups who have the seasonal flu immunisation
  6. Raise awareness of drinking a sensible amount of alcohol
  7. More urgent treatment outside of A&E
  8. Support more people to achieve a healthy weight
  9. More promotion and professional advice for healthy lifestyles and services
  10. Improve oral health and dental treatment
  11. Support more people to quit smoking
  12. Increase the uptake of national screening programmes
  13. Encourage parents to protect their children through immunisation
  14. Reduce deaths due to heat-waves or severe cold weather
  15. Support more people who want to die at home with a terminal illness
  16. Get more people participating in physical activity
  17. Increase and support the number of people taking up direct payments

Respondents mostly felt that these recommendations, if implemented, would have beneficial impacts on the protected characteristics, with an acknowledgement from some that in these austere times there was concern over whether sufficient resources would be made available.

Suggested actions
Additional priorities identified worthy of note included:

  • The colder weather always brings with it poorer health in some residents health especially amongst our older generation. The Warmer Homes Project this year was a great success in providing Warm Clothing, Warm Bedding, Food and Warm Centres for vulnerable residents. Hopefully a scheme like this will happen this winter.
  • Staff training to spot people that are in difficulty and in need of specified help.
  • More at home Physiotherapy for stroke victims.
  • Support for men who may also be victims of domestic violence.
  • Teenage Pregnancy. Increased Relationship and Sexual Health Education and access to sexual health services.  Supporting of teenage parents to develop themselves and skills to engage with EET.
  • Second and third generation residents should be given priority in housing to ensure familial support is not destroyed leading to isolation and distress.

6.   Equality Forum Findings  

Detailed below are summaries taken from various meetings with Equality forums and additional targeted consultations.


Age 

Older people pointed out the issue of lack of female doctors, particularly a concern for women of a Muslim faith and that poor quality sheltered and supported accommodation needs to be addressed.  There was little awareness of free leisure services for people aged over 60.  Out of hours services are a vital life line and also saves the Council money by not requiring certain staff such as wardens to be on site 24/7.  There was confusion over the similarity and effectiveness of non emergency phone numbers, such as the Police 101 line and the NHS 111 line.


Disability 

People with disabilities were concerned that adjustments can have a detrimental impact on crime by highlighting a home as a potential target.  Employment and volunteering was seen as a real issue, although organisations such as Mencap and Livability which helps people with LD to start up their own business, should be supported.  DABD and the Council were highlighted as having volunteering programmes which should be extended to other partner organisations.  It was felt that that given the high level of need locally for mental health services there should be more investment.  There was concern that Children’s homes and schools don’t tend to cater for mental health as organisations are afraid to label children.  The all encompassing mental health umbrella is not helpful - conditions should be rated by severity.  Professionals need to be clear on the difference between Learning difficulties and disabilities.


Gender (including transgender) 

There is an increasing problem of:

  • Domestic and sexual violence and exploitation of young girls
  • An increase in domestic and sexual violence and exploitation, particularly affecting young girls.  This is linked to a rise in HIV transmission / forced marriage and deliberate infection of HIV.
  • Need to put services where people already go to and want to access them, for example issues over dignity – some women may not want to attend a mobile screening clinic in a supermarket car park.
  • Lack of awareness of Well women clinics, which currently depends on an informed GP to suggest these.  Better awareness in the first instance may lead to a reduction in GP visits.
  • Lack of awareness around smear and breast screening.
  • Exclusion of Muslim women from local leisure centres through a lack of women only services.
  • Need to support local groups through commissioning.

Race 

There are issues around people who do not have a legal right to remain in the UK accessing health services.  Organisations such as Project London, a private healthcare advocacy charity, support such service users who often do not have the necessary documentation to be registered with a GP.  There is a link between inappropriate attendance at A&E and socially excluded patients.  Concerns that health profiling as utilised in the 2011 JSNA can link conditions to race which can be stigmatising.  For example, Hepatitis is often linked to Asian and African countries and not European countries.  Similarly with TB, the issue of people spitting on the street is not just a BAME issue. 

Through a meeting with the Irish Traveller Movement in Britain, findings arose about the health needs of this community, not currently mentioned in the JSNA.

 


Nationally 

  • Gypsies, Irish and Roma Travellers have been recognised as ethnic minorities since 2001.
  • Ealing have a lot of date on their sizable community.
  • Socially excluded with significantly worse health outcomes and literacy levels.
  • Children’s centres are good places to engage as are Catholic Churches.
  • High rates of heart disease and Type 2 diabetes due to poor diet and higher suicide rates of young males.
  • Only 8 out of the former PCTs across England had included explicit reference and work around this community in their JSNA’s.
  • High incidence of inappropriate attendance at A and E due to low levels of registering with GPs.

Locally 

  • Barking and Dagenham does have a traveller health visitor, Maria O’Donnell but unfortunately, due to sickness has been unable to contribute to this EIA.
  • Barking and Dagenham Council and NHS North East London and the City do monitor ‘gypsy and Irish traveller’ as a category in ethnic monitoring which is progressive.
  • Dagenham Market is a local meeting point for this community
  • The location of the local travellers’ site is Eastbrook End Travellers Site, Chase Lane.  They are mostly English.  The site has 11 pitches and there is a waiting list for the site.  The site is mostly made up of single mums with children.  There are six families on site with 10 – 12 children.  The children on site are between 6 weeks and 16.  There are two single men on site, one in his 40 the other in his 80’s. The site has been there for about 40 years, but needs money spending on site.
  • Specific issues include:
    • Education for children once they turn 12, nothing for children to do on site, condition of bathrooms, funding for fencing, people’s perception.
    • Dietary - Healthy eating with some children being overweight.
    • Immunisations - The uptake of Primary immunisations is good but for MMR this is low.
    • Education - Primary school is accessed but not Secondary School. There are ongoing discussions about home tuition for the teenagers.
    • Housing - There are six caravans which are leased and the rent paid by housing benefit.
    • Families attend a satellite clinic Marie holds at Rush green Medical centre. Where they get advice on a range of issues including contraception.
  • Many professionals in local organisations do not know of the site, their culture, getting funding for the site, supplying facilities for them.  Consequently they are often not treated equally.  The council contact for the travelers is Dawn Sharman.  There are monthly meetings between different sections of the Council, the NHS health visitor and the London Gypsy and Traveller Unit.

Religion and belief 

There are dignity issues for example Muslim women will not want to attend mobile screening clinics in very public places for example in supermarket car parks.  There is an increase of incidences of deliberate infection of HIV linked with a rise in the number of forced marriages.  Commissioners need to put services where people attend for example in mosques.  There can be detrimental impacts caused by exclusion for example Muslim women may not feel able to access the borough’s leisure centres due to a lack of women only services.  The lack of female doctors is an issue for women of a Muslim faith.


Sexual orientation 

The issue of recording service users sexual orientation raises concerns, especially for young people who are in care until the age of 18.  At what age monitoring should begin was raised.  The issue is more sensitive when discussing with people with LD.   By declaring your sexuality there was concern that this could make people more vulnerable.  Trans people accessing services could be classed as vulnerable by an unhelpful GP.


7 Targeted Consultations  

Bad Youth Forum 12 June - 19 young people took part in the consultation

 

 

·         On recommendation 5.8 - Free leisure for people aged over 60

There was an acknowledgement that free swimming should be encouraged but concern over how this could continue to be funded given the current financial climate.

·         On recommendation 2.11 - More emphasis on road safety for children:
While younger people felt they were taught sufficiently about this, ultimately rules would be forgotten when under time pressures.  Trinity School was highlighted as possibly needing more emphasis on this topic.

·         On recommendation 3.5 - More support for young people not in employment education or training:
More information on alternative options was highlighted, from part time jobs for under 16s to NVQ’s, BTECs, work experience and advice on practical not just academic career paths.

·         On recommendation 3.5 - More investment in tackling childhood obesity
Ideas to tackle this problem ranged from introducing age restrictions on fast food shops to restricting the number of fast food shops near schools and health warnings on fast food packaging although there were concerns whether this would really have a beneficial impact or not.  More food inspections to raise the standards in current fast food shops was also highlighted.

·         On recommendation 3.10 - Expansion of the healthy eating reward card scheme for 11-19 year olds
Comparing the scheme to commercially run equivalents found the Council administered scheme badly lacking around customer service.  Concerns were also raised that it didn’t actually help to tackle bullying as instead of demanding cash, bullies would have food purchased for them instead.

·         On recommendation 2.8 - Breastfeeding promotion by NHS and schools Education on sexual health let alone breastfeeding was thought to be lacking 


·         On recommendation 7.17 - Non-judgmental and ‘young person friendly’ sexual health services should be promoted
Faith based schools were considered lacking in covering this topic and concern was raised that promoting YPF would compromise young people being able to access the services without their parents finding out.

 

·         On the other priorities: 

Maples learning disability resource centre  – 21 June -  8 people took part – mostly older carers of people with moderate – severe LD.  One service user was present
 

Age

·         On recommendation 5.8 - More emphasis on independent living 


·         On recommendation 5.8 – Improve poor quality homes
This was felt to be crucial to support people living their lives healthily in their own homes for as long as possible and to tackle issues such as overcrowding.

·         On recommendation 7.27 - More nurses to support people returning home after a stay in hospital

·         On recommendation 7.29 - More information and support for patients and carers
More information on individual budgets was highlighted although there were concerns about whether this initiative would be sufficiently funded.  Carers felt that those who ‘shouted the loudest’ were the ones who got their needs met.

·         On recommendation 7.29 - Provision of out of hours care to support patients and carers

Current provision was considered effective and should be continued.

 


Disability

·         On recommendation 4.3 - Easier way for people with learning disabilities to get into paid and unpaid employment
Given the number of non disabled people who cannot get jobs this was considered an aspiration unlikely to be met.  There was criticism of organisations such as Pure Innovations and Toucan who promise much but largely fail to deliver.

·         On recommendation 4.4 - Support for organisations that recruit volunteers with mental health needs 

·         On recommendation 5.7 - Support for people to move on from supported accommodation on to independent living 
Carers considered the move from caring to supporting a difficult transition especially when service users are capable of doing something but have had it done for them for many years.

·         On recommendation 7.25 - Promotion of the ‘Mental Health Direct’ 24 hour support line and the ‘NHS 111’ service
These were considered important but awareness should be improved.


On recommendation 7.25 -
Specialist services for people with both learning disabilities and mental illness
More support in this area was considered necessary but there were concerns that sufficient funding would not be allocated to have a beneficial impact.


8 Key Suggested Actions  

From equality forums and targeted consultations:

·           Partnership to promote NHS 111 non emergency line, 101 non emergency police line and Council hate crime reporting.

·           Council to ensure sufficient women only activities in the borough’s leisure centre’s to ensure there is not a detrimental impact on religion and belief

·           Partnership to ensure training for professionals includes the difference between learning difficulty and learning disability.

·           Partnership to review how Streetbase and Young Person Friendly are administered to ensure maximum value for money.

·           Partnership to ensure that the local traveller community are key stakeholders of the Health and wellbeing board.

 

 


9  Lessons Learnt  

  •          From hard copy questionnaires left at Barking Town Hall, Dagenham Civic Centre, Dagenham Heathway Library and the Barking Learning Centre, none were returned, despite offering SAE’s. 
  •          Requests to promote the questionnaire via Council channels, both internally – via Feedback and e-bulletin and externally – via The News were ignored.  When public health formally becomes part of the local authority post April 2013 closer working will be necessary.
  •          As this consultation was time and resource limited, care should be taken when basing commissioning decisions on this Equality Impact Assessment.  It may be necessary to undertake additional targeted consultation to address any perceived gaps or to go into further detail.  For example consultation with the existing equality forums was highlighted as a principle route although the forums do not cover all the protected characteristics and some are more mature than others. 
  •          An additional free form question on gender would have given the opportunity for additional comments.
  •          Incorporating an incentive of a prize draw, of four £25 gift vouchers that could be used in local shops encouraged a higher response rate.
  •          Given the low levels of literacy in the borough and the growing importance of JSNAs, consideration should be given to producing a Plain English version to save the need to ‘translate’ recommendations when engaging with the public.


Materials produced to support consultation

  •          Joint event presentation 060612 ppt
  •          BAD youth forum presentation 120612 ppt
  •          JSNA session pdf
  •          Making sure your differences count doc
  •          Making sure your differences count BAD doc
  •          Making sure your differences count Maples doc
  •          Maples presentation 200612 ppt